Archive for Bush

Merit pay, an anathema for teachers’ unions?

It seems simple. Someone does a great job and he is rewarded – typically with more money in a capitalistic society. If he does a poor job; he is not rewarded. In many facets of business and society, it works brilliantly. Common sense tells us that creating a such a sytem would motivate any employee, including teachers:

Bush seeks teacher merit-pay funds

President Bush wants more money in the 2008 budget for a fund that encourages performance-based pay systems for teachers — a request that will no doubt feed into the larger debate on Capitol Hill about how best to attract, create and retain effective teachers.

The administration is asking for $199 million for its Teacher Incentive Fund, which was created in 2006. The fund provides financial incentives for teachers and principals who improve student achievement in high-poverty schools and helps to recruit top teachers to these schools. Rewards are left up to the states to decide and can include bonuses or raises.

Dangle reward. Do well. Receive reward. It’s not climatological science! We’re taught this system as very young children even before we enter school. A reward is often a motivator for good behavior, completing chores, kissing Great Aunt Ethel. For children entering school, grades become the reward; though some teachers have been known to give out candy and trinkets to motivate their students. Public school teachers are well aware of this cause and effect response.

However, public school teachers are union members and the rules of the motivation system somehow do not apply.

The top teachers union has criticized the fund.

Reg Weaver, president of the National Education Association, recently said the setup “is nothing more than a merit-pay system, and merit pay hasn’t worked wherever it has been tried, for the most part.”

Far from spurring teachers on to greater effectiveness, extra bonuses for some and not others simply “creates tension” between teachers and kills any teamwork, he said.

“It doesn’t work and it’s not going to do anything to attract and retain quality teachers,” Mr. Weaver said. What will work is getting teachers involved in the decision-making process, giving them a safe and orderly school and a decent salary, he said.

My question is, what does motivate our public school teachers to do their best? If it’s pride in their job and students, then why would attractive salaries be a motivator? Reg Weaver is wrong and his positing otherwise is a glaring show of the disconnection between teachers’ unions and reality.

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They support the troops with graffitti, spit, and threats

You probably have already heard that the moonbats – those wonderful activists that work for the betterment of the world, have left their mark on the Capitol steps.

Graffiti:

Anti-war protesters were allowed to spray paint on part of the west front steps of the United States Capitol building after police wereordered to break their security line by their leadership, two sources toldThe Hill.

According to the sources, police officers were livid when theywere told to fall back by U.S. Capitol Police (USCP) Chief Phillip Morse andDeputy Chief Daniel Nichols. “They were the commanders on the scene,” one source said,who requested anonymity. “It was disgusting.”

After police ceded the stairs, located on the lower west front of the Capitol, the building was locked down, the source added.

A second source who witnessed the incident said that the policehad the crowd stopped at Third Street, but were told to bring the police line in front of the Capitol.

Approximately 300 protesters were allowed to take the steps and began to spray paint “anarchist symbols” and phrase such as “Our capitol building” and “you can’t stop us” around the area, the source said.

Spit:

There were a few tense moments, however, including an encounter involving Joshua Sparling, 25, who was on crutches and who said he was a corporal with the 82nd Airborne Division and lost his right leg below the knee in Ramadi, Iraq. Mr. Sparling spoke at a smaller rally held earlier in the day at the United States Navy Memorial, and voiced his support for the administration’s policies in Iraq.

Later, as antiwar protesters passed where he and his group were standing, words were exchanged and one of the antiwar protestors spit at the ground near Mr. Sparling; he spit back.

Threats:

protest.jpg

Photo links to moonbat protester photo page.

And finally…

Puke

Some lively quotes from the pukey video of Jane:

…I haven’t spoken at an antiwar rally in 34 years because I’ve been afraid that because of the lies that have been and continue to be spread about me and that war, that they would be used to hurt this new anti-war movement. But silence is no longer an option. {enthusiastic nostalgic applause}

I’m so sad that we still have to do this – that we did not learn the lessons from the Viet Nam War. {Yes Jane – you did not learn the lessons did you? What about that apology?} That we’ve made the same mistakes, blindness to the realities on the ground, hubris and arrogance in dealing with a people and culture far older than we are and that we understand so little. {A people and culture far older than we are? What are you saying here Jane? We’re not being understanding enough of a group of misogynistic people who would have no problem beheading you after humiliating you in the worst possible physical ways?}

update.png This montage shows the protestors getting past the barricade and going up the Capitol steps

More from HotAir.com , Michelle Malkin, and Captain’s Quarters

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State of the Union Address Poll

Allah Pundit is running a poll at HotAir.com “What did you think of the State of the Union Address last night?” As of 6:53 am ET, the poll numbers are running: 69% It was great; 21% it was OK; and 10% It was poor.

Add your vote to the poll.

SOTU discussions, videos and more here:

State of the Union: The biggest non-event of the year (HotAir.com)

and here:

Michelle Malkin

and here:

Church and State -State of the Union from the Left & Right

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